IOSH Working Safely could solve your green card issues (CSCS)

You’ll have to forgive us for a title which doesn’t seem that descriptive but you either know about this issue or you don’t!

 

The green labourers card for gaining access to construction sites requires that you have “a qualification equivalent to a Level 1 Award in health and safety in a construction environment”.

The good news is that the IOSH Working Safely course (1 day) has now been deemed to satisfy that requirement. This means that attending and passing this course and then the touch screen operative test (which is part of the CSCS) scheme will enable you to receive a green card.

Quite long-winded we know but it will solve a problem for a great many of our construction clients, see below for a number of frequently asked questions relating to the CSCS Green Card for Labourers and IOSH Working Safely:

Frequently-asked questions

Do I need to pass the IOSH Working safely end of course assessments before I can apply for a CSCS green Labourer card?
Yes – you’ll have to prove you’ve successfully completed the
Working safely course. You can do this by providing a copy of
your Working safely IOSH certificate or IOSH passport card.

How do I apply for a new CSCS green Labourer card?
You’ll need to have completed your Working safely course on or after 01 October 2011 – so within the last three years.  You’ll also need to visit an approved test centre to sit your
CITB Health, Safety and Environment Operative test. For more information, please contact CITB on 0344 994 4488.  Once you’ve successfully completed this test, you can then apply for your CSCS green Labourer card.

How much does it cost to sit the CITB Health, Safety and Environment Operative test?
It costs £17.50.

What does the CSCS green Labourer card cost?
It costs £30 and the card is usually despatched on the next working day.

I’ve lost my IOSH certificate or IOSH passport card – how
do I get a replacement?
You’ll need to contact your training provider and they’ll order you a replacement. There will normally be a charge for this.

How do I renew my CSCS green Labourer card?
You can book onto IOSH’s one-day Working safely course.

Other questions
My training provider wrote their own version of the generic Working safely course and had it approved by IOSH – can my delegates still apply for a green Labourer card?
Yes they can, as long as they have successfully completed the course within the last three years.

Does this include e-learning versions of the generic Working safely course which have been approved by IOSH?
Yes – again, as long as the course was completed within the last three years.

Have IOSH updated the existing Working safely course materials?
No, they haven’t updated the course materials. This is scheduled for 2015.

If you’ve got questions or need support on safety in the industrial, contracting or construction sectors please contact us for sensible and proportionate advice on 01453 800100

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Please complete the form below and we promise to respond within 24 hrs. If you need more urgent help just call 01453 800109 and ask for Andrea.

 

HSE Starts new crackdown on construction sites for October

Safety inspectors have pledged “robust” action as part of a crackdown on poor standards and unsafe working practices on Britain’s building sites.

A month-long campaign has just been launched by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) aimed at reducing the number of accidents on smaller construction sites.

Philip White, the HSE’s chief inspector of construction, urged firms to make sure working conditions on sites were safe and that health issues were being properly considered, he said:

“Industry has made much progress in reducing the number of people killed and injured in its activities, but for every fatal accident, approximately 100 construction workers die from a work-related cancer.

“During the recent health initiative, enforcement action was taken on one in six sites. Time and again we find smaller contractors working on refurbishment and repair work failing to protect their workers through a lack of awareness and poor control of risks.

“This isn’t acceptable – it costs lives, and we will take strong and robust action where we find poor practice and risky behaviour.

“Through campaigns like this we aim to ensure contractors take all risks to their workers seriously, and not just focus on immediate safety implications.

“They need to put in place practical measures to keep workers both safe and well.”

Steve Murphy, general secretary of construction union Ucatt, commented:

“A month long clampdown on employers risking the health of workers is welcome. However the health of workers is being damaged 12 months a year, that is why we need extra resources for the HSE in order to properly protect the safety of construction workers.”

If you’ve got questions or need support on safety in the industrial, contracting or construction sectors please contact us for sensible and proportionate advice on 01453 800100

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Please complete the form below and we promise to respond within 24 hrs. If you need more urgent help just call 01453 800109 and ask for Andrea.

 

CDM 2015

As CDM Coordinators / Principal Designer Consultants we have been watching developments on CDM 2015 with interest.  To make a very quick summary we don’t think too much will change in the next 12 months and the regs may take even longer to come into force.  One thing which does seem likely is that the new regulations will affect even the smallest and simplest of projects and this is likely to raise eyebrows, tempers [and some new FFI income for HSE].

The reason for this expectation is that CDM will be applying to domestic projects involving 3 or more contractors, this has led to them being referred to as the new bathroom regulations (1 tiler, 1 plumber and 1 carpenter = 1 CDM job).

We recently read an interesting article on SHP about the new regulations and the feedback gained from the consultation, a lot of which HSE has rejected. Another case of government spin on reducing regulation or a genuine attempt to reform the regulations for the good of all.. you decide.

Read on below to find out more or view the article yourself at http://www.shponline.co.uk/selective-hearing-cdm-2015/

The Health and Safety Executive’s consultation on CDM 2015 garnered 1,427 responses which HSE has claimed gave them ‘a strong case to proceed’ with the implementation of CDM 15 broadly as proposed.

However, HSE has stated that “among the 1,427 responses received, some 65 per cent were received from either CDM co-ordinators or from the entertainment sector (which was not the target of the consultation) whose responses are effectively campaigns”.  It went on to state that while HSE acknowledged the difficulties for the entertainment sector, more weight was given to ‘representative’ responses. It was quite clear from the content of the report that absolutely no consideration was given to the points that would have been raised by the 400 respondents from the events and entertainments sector.

Presumably therefore, the ‘strong case’ was built on the 35 per cent of ‘representative’ respondents who came up with the answer that the HSE was looking for. Of the total responses not considered 28 per cent were from the events (entertainment) industry.  How can HSE maintain on the one hand that they were not the target of the consultation and on the other insist that these regulations will still apply to that industry? How is an industry to respond to the prospect of the imposition of a weighty piece of health and safety law that never applied to it before, if not to organise itself so that it can form a view and respond in a coherent way? This is not a ‘campaign’ it is a legitimate response by an industry to a public consultation process; a ‘campaign’ is writing angry letters to your MP and The Times.
 
The response to Consultation Document 261 posed 20 questions requiring individuals to respond and necessitating the analysis and consideration of some serious and complex issues. The 400 event industry responses came from individual business leaders in the industry, some at director level, and safety professionals who are experts in their respective fields across TV, entertainment, theatres, exhibitions, festivals and sporting events. These were not ‘unrepresentative’ and these are the same professionals on whom HSE will presumably rely to draft the relevant guidance to the new regulations. Will their views be summarily dismissed in this process too? All these individuals took time out of their busy working lives to give serious consideration to a public consultation process only to have their views and their responses high-handedly discounted.
 
With the CDM co-ordinators there is an obvious issue. It is easy to see why they would not respond favourably to a proposal in which their role will be cut, however, this was a public consultation process and they were entitled to have their views considered, not arbitrarily dismissed en masse as being partisan.
 
The events industry broadly agrees that CDM 15, which never applied before, is fundamentally ill suited to the industry as a whole and the costs of implementing it will be disproportionate to any benefits. HSE thus far has not articulated a case to show that these regulations are a necessary imposition on an industry that is vital to Britain’s economy at a time when the Government is supposed to be paring back over burdensome and unnecessary regulation on businesses.
 
The key questions here, however, are what is the point of a public consultation process when the public body concerned ignores the answers that inconveniently do not the support the legislation it is proposing to bring in? And how can we have faith in future consultations on health and safety legislation?

We hope the above helps.  If you’re already a client then please contact us for more advice and if you’re not yet a client, please give us a call on 01453 800100 for some advice and a competitive cost on closing out all of the issues above.

If you’ve got questions or need support on safety in the industrial, contracting or construction sectors please contact us for sensible and proportionate advice on 01453 800100

Contact form

Please complete the form below and we promise to respond within 24 hrs. If you need more urgent help just call 01453 800109 and ask for Andrea.

Fine for solar panel installer after work falls through fragile roof

We are working for more and more PV solar installers and have supported them in improving their safety management systems but there are still a huge umber of firms out there using poor methods and not giving safety the attention it deserves as the accident below shows.  If you are working in renewables including biomass, PV solar or similar please give us a call on 01453 800100 to find out how we can work with you to reduce and control your risk.


Brynley Perrett, 37, suffered a compression fracture of his back and sternum after falling 15ft through a fragile roof at Llan-y-nant Farm, near Trellech, Monmouthshire in June 2013. His brother Anthony, was fortunate to escape injury and the firm employing them has been fined £4,500 and costs of £1,500

The pair were installing solar panels on a building at the farm on behalf of Mr Andrew Green, trading as Green Park Power. He was prosecuted by HSE after an investigation found there was no equipment or measures in place, such as nets or scaffold edge protection, to prevent or mitigate the effects of a fall.

Cwmbran Magistrates’ Court heard that Mr Green failed to make an adequate assessment of the risks of working on a fragile roof and did not take sufficient action to reduce those risks.  Mr Green, of Maple Close, Abergavenny, pleaded guilty to a breach of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act

HSE Inspector Steve Richardson, speaking after the hearing, said:

“Both brothers were fortunate not to have suffered far more serious injury in this easily avoidable incident. Had nets or other safety measures been installed then the fall risk would have been significantly minimised and the likelihood of injury reduced.

“Working on a roof can be dangerous, with falls accounting for more deaths in the construction industry than any other type of incident. The risks are well known, and guidance is freely available outlining how to work safely at height.

“The onus was on Mr Green to ensure the safety of those in his employment, but he failed to do so. Those in charge of the work must be properly qualified and competent to ensure that the work is carried out safely.”

We hope the above helps.  If you’re already a client then please contact us for more advice and if you’re not yet a client, please give us a call on 01453 800100 for some advice and a competitive cost on closing out all of the issues above.

If you’ve got questions or need support on safety in the industrial, contracting or construction sectors please contact us for sensible and proportionate advice on 01453 800100

Contact form

Please complete the form below and we promise to respond within 24 hrs. If you need more urgent help just call 01453 800109 and ask for Andrea.